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The Top Questions...and answers on Measuring Temperature in Glass Production

Get the answers to the top questions asked about temperature measurement in glass production

1. How can I measure Glass Tank Refractory Temperatures?

The NIR Borescope is used for continuous temperature monitoring and recording of the refractory inside a glass tank offering repeatable, reliable and calibrated, traceable temperature measurements. The NIR-B thermal imaging camera provides over 32 thousand continuous measurement points for asset protection, air ingress and capturing the optical profiles with a crystal-clear picture. Because the NIR-B uses the same wavelength and filters as the industry standard Cyclops C100L data is directly comparable. 

For routine spot checks and shooting optical profiles the industry standard Cyclops C100L(2F) is in common use offering repeatable, reliable and calibrated traceable temperature measurement.  

2. How can I measure and visualise the flame length and path in a Glass Melt Tank?

The NIR Borescope  whilst providing continuous temperature monitoring of refractories, also provides a crystal clear visual image inside the glass tank and visualisation of flames and or flame heat distribution. This allows the system to monitor and alarm if there is flame impingement which is very important on Oxy fuelled furnaces. The Land Image Processing Software provides an integration function which reveals true flame intensely, offering an insight into the efficiency of combustion, flame length optimisation and NOx generation.     

3. How can I extend the life time of a Glass Melt Tank?

By utilising a high accuracy thermal imaging device like the NIR Borescope to measure, monitor and record refractory over temperatures (flame impingement) and under temperatures (air leaks / Sodium Hydroxide formation) it is practical to significantly and safely extend the life of a tank. The NIR-B system offers instantaneous information to trigger key alarms as well as long term trend analysis. Every additional day of life is additional production and provides an excellent case for return on investment. 

Positioning an ARC thermal imaging camera underneath the glass tank to detect for hot spots allows early warning of potential weak spots.

4. How can I optimise the Glass production in a Glass Melt Tank?

The high-quality image produced by the NIR Borescope allows real time data to be streamed in time lapse modes to allow the Process Engineers to visualise the flow of the glass melt batch over the process time. 

This allows statistical levels and alarms to be set in the control equipment on optimum glass quality production.

5. How can I measure glass temperature in the Forehearth?

The Model FG fibre-optic thermometer is the standard industry choice for Forehearth applications allowing correlation against triple X thermocouples to provide a dynamic temperature feedback of the Forehearth. The Model FG is exceptionally stable over time compared to thermocouple solutions and will provide you a consistent datum to allow offsets to be applied to the system. Particularly of benefit for use in coloured glass applications where measuring the near surface temperature will avoid the top becoming frozen during cooling operations.

6. How can I measure the temperature of the glass gobs?

It is common practice to use the Cyclops C100L(2F) to take spot checks of gob temperatures. Depending on the size of the gob, care must be taken not to “see through” the gob, therefore it is common practice to look up into the neck of the forehearth to capture a repeatable and reliable measurement. Portable devices such as the Cyclops C100L can be subject to operator error in alignment which is why many companies are using a fixed spot infrared thermometer, depending on access to the gob, shear or oil spray obscuration a monochrome or ratio (two colour) fixed point fibreoptic infrared thermometer is used.

7. How can I measure the weight of the glass gobs?

The weight of the Gob is a function of viscosity which determines the flow of glass which is directly correlated to temperature, utilising the Cyclops C100L or a fixed fibreoptic infrared thermometer enables gob temperature to be monitored and controlled resulting in a more consistent gob weight. 

8. How do I ensure uniformity of the glass sheet in the Lehr?

There are two options; either a row of highly correlated fixed spot infrared thermometers measuring single lines down the Lehr or the more accurate line scanning solution. The line scanner uses a single high speed and high stability detector and rotating mirror arrangement to view an 80-degree scan angle generating 1,000 temperature readings across the width of the ribbon up to 150 scan lines per second to build a complete thermal map of the Lehr being scanned. 

Utilising a nominal 5-micron wavelength scanner, the LSP-HD 5FL Float Line system has been developed to offer long term stability and performance in a hot ambient whist maintaining a seal to the process. It is optimised for measuring glass temperature with software to create thermal maps and zone outputs for alarms, process monitoring and for automated control systems.

9. How do I ensure temperature of the glass sheet in the annealing Lehr?

There are two options; either a row of highly correlated fixed spot infrared thermometers measuring single lines down the Lehr or the more accurate line scanning solution. The line scanner uses a single high speed and high stability detector and rotating mirror arrangement to view an 80-degree scan angle generating 1,000 temperature readings across the width of the ribbon up to 150 scan lines per second to build a complete thermal map of the Lehr being scanned. 

Utilising a nominal 5-micron wavelength scanner, the LSP-HD 5FL Float Line system has been developed to offer long term stability and performance in a hot ambient whist maintaining a seal to the process. It is optimised for measuring glass temperature with software to create thermal maps and zone outputs for alarms, process monitoring and for automated control systems and allows optimisation of the Lehr heating and cooling to ensure optimum throughput and product quality.

10. How do I control the quality of the finished tempered product?

The key to glass tempering is highly accurate temperature profiles measured across the glass being tempered. The AMETEK Land scanner solution uses a single 5 micron wavelength line scanner which has a single high speed and high stability detector looking at a rotating mirror arrangement to view over an 80-degree scan angle and generating 1,000 temperatures readings across the whole width of the outlet of the tempering furnace. With up to 150 scan lines per second the Landscan system can generate complete thermal map of the bed being scanned covering multiple sheets. The LSP-HD 50 range is specifically optimised for this type of application and is placed between the exit of the furnace and the air quench. 

11. How do I measure temperature of low emissivity glass?

The AMETEK Land Glass Tempering Furnace System meets the challenge of accurately measuring glass temperatures for plants running multiple glass types – even using a variety of coatings, including low-emissivity surfaces by automatically compensating for changes in emissivity.

Easy to install and use, AMETEK Land’s high-precision technology provides greater quality control, without destructive testing, for a more consistent product. It also prevents overheating, minimising wasted energy and ensuring cost-efficiency.

By combining our advanced, high-definition LSP-HD line scanner and compact digital SOLOnet thermometer, the system uses dedicated Windows PC software for simultaneous data processing. Configurable alarms can be set to specific process conditions, instantly alerting operators to product quality issues.

By producing highly detailed glass temperature measurements, independent of coating, Glass Tempering Furnace System is ideal for glass toughening plants across the world.

 

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